Understand tables in Relatics

Understand tables in Relatics

Tables in Relatics are designed in such a way that you can understand the systems engineering model. A table consists of a model row, element rows, a ghost row and optionally a table header. By studying the table, you can learn about the properties of the presented elements, find out how the elements are interrelated, and experience what the expected behavior in the workspace is.

Standard tables

By default, model objects in Relatics are presented in a standard table. In the picture below, an example of a table in Relatics is shown.

 

Model row

The model row contains one or more columns and sub-columns to describe the context of the presented parts of the systems engineering model. The model row is shown for each table, both on the overview and detail view. Below, the visualization characteristics of the model row are described:

Characteristic Explanation Example
Main element The first column of the table shows the main element. It is the main subject.
  • Element ‘Object’.
Properties Properties are shown as sub-columns within the column of an element. The properties describe an element.
  • Element ‘Object’ has properties ‘Name’ and ‘Status’.
Relations Relations are shown as separate columns.

  • A relation is described with a meaningful role name together with the name of the to-element in bold.
  • A relation is outgoing when the role name is written in roman and the relation is incoming when the role name is written in italics.
  • A relation is multi when the name of the related element is written in plural and the relation is single when the name of the related element is written in singular.
  • Element ‘Object’ has relation ‘Is subject of’ to element ‘Risk’.
  • Element ‘Object’ has relation ‘Has responsible’ element ‘Person’.
  • Element ‘Object’ has outgoing relation ‘Has responsible’ to element ‘Person’.
  • Element ‘Object’ has incoming relation ‘Is subject of’ from element ‘Risk’.
  • Element ‘Object’ has a single relation to ‘Person’ as ‘Person’ is written in singular.
Background color The background color of the columns indicate how the type elements are interrelated. If the background color of a column is slightly darker than the previous column, it implies that a relation exists between the two corresponding type elements.
  • Elements ‘Risk’ and ‘Person’ are directly related to ‘Object’ as the corresponding columns are one shade darker than the column for Object.
  • Element ‘Control measure’ is directly related to ‘Risk’ as the column for ‘Measure’ is one shade darker than the column for ‘Risk’.
Icons Each presented element shows an icon. This helps to visually recognize an element at a glance without always having to read the full text of an element.
  • Element ‘Object’ has an icon of a brick.
  • Element ‘Risk’ has an icon of lightning.
Derived and middle elements Derived and middle elements are shown as separate columns.

  • The name of the derived or middle element is shown. No role name is shown.
  • The cardinality of the derived or middle element is multi when the name of the element is written in plural and the cardinality is single when the name of the element is written in singular.
  • Element ‘Object’ has a derived element ‘Control measure’.
  • Derived element ‘Control measure’ is multi as the name of the element ‘Control measures’ is written in plural.

Note:

Element rows

An element row shows an element that a user has created. The elements presented in the element rows correspond with the model row. The element rows are shown for each table, both on the overview and detail view. The same visualization characteristics apply to elements rows as for the model row. In addition:

  • Each element has an ID. It contains a three-letter prefix and an incremental number which is presented at the beginning of a column. In the example above, the object with the name ‘Bridge’ has the ID ‘OBJ-1’.

Note:

  • By default, elements are sorted on ID. You can sort elements to influence the order in which elements are presented.

Ghost row

A ghost row is shown at the bottom of a table. It acts as a template for creating new elements. By entering a value in one of the cells of the ghost row, a new element is created.

Table header

A table header is only shown for tables on the detail view of an element. The table headers show the (role) name of the related element. This provides the needed context so you can interpret the model row and elements in the table. The same visualization characteristics apply to elements rows as for the model row. In addition:

  • Derived and middle elements can be recognized by the icon .
  • Hierarchical elements can be recognized by the icon .
  •  A collection relation can be recognized by the icon.

Navigation and edit behavior

  • In the model row, you can click on the name of a relation to open the related elements view.
  • In an element row, you can click on an ID of an element to show its detail view.
  • In an element row, you can click on the icon of an element to select it. For example, to copy and paste an element.
  • In the table header, you can click on the name of a relation to open the related elements view.
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